Wool & cakes

August 27, 2011

A rainy start to Saturday, and an opportunity courtesy of my friend Libby to visit John Lewis for a Knitty coffee morning. That meant coffee, cake, the chance to view some new collection knitted garments, pattern books and 10% off Rowan wool and patterns. All this was hosted by Kirsty the Rowan Design Consultant modelling a cool cardigan: pattern book 50. Kidding! Can't remember which pattern book it came from, the acoustics were bad in that corner of the cafe.

I love this kind of thing, not necessarily the overpriced pattern books or wool, but the chance to have a chat with people who share a common hobby. There was chat about casting on - I thought there were only two methods, I'm a 'thumb' girl myself...but NO, according to Kirsty there are at least twenty seven different ways; Turkish cast-on, old Norwegian cast-on, braided cast-on to name but a few! Oh, to be as knowledgeable as Kirsty. I asked Kirsty a personal question, "do you slip the first stitch?" because the world of knitting seems to be divided into those who do and those who don't. ( why is life is always like that for women? ) Kirsty does. That made me feel good as I was recently lambasted by a wool shop owner (who shall remain nameless because I want to buy more wool at her shop), because I mentioned I slip the first stitch. I never think it's a good marketing strategy to make your customers feel stupid, but I recognised that this was no ordinary shop and insults were obviously part and parcel of the experience. I know this because I heard her doing the loud tut-tut thing at another customer over some confessed knitting misdemeanour, in this case it was missing out the picot edge on a shawl. "Take this customer out the back and whip her with some Hayfield Aran, Elsie - she didn't knit her picot edge". She didn't actually shout this but I'm pretty sure she wanted to. Kirsty is cool and wears vampish red lipstick and I felt strangely vindicated when I knew she slipped the first stitch too...

Libby and I shared a table with a lovely lady who was wearing a beautiful lacy scarf which I instantly recognised as being a free pattern from Ravelry. That's what I mean; common interests break down barriers and we then learned from her about life lines used when knitting lacy stuff; who knew! If you really want to find out about knitting life lines with dental floss you can read about it here. Now, I'm no knitting guru unlike Libby who is uber talented at both knitting and crochet, I just dabble but I would love time to do more, maybe I could hang out at the Ravelry forums and talk life lines with the lovely ladies there, knit intricate lacy little numbers, have long discussions about the pros and cons of casting on and off. Seriously - would I? Probably not.





1 comment:

Lynne said...

NEVER been able to knit but how how this makes me want to.....

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